Thursday, January 01, 2009

New Year

We went to Taj (Chennai!) on new year's eve for dinner. My dad, in the middle of conversation remarked, "Dec 31 is just another day!". He was talking of existential perspective. Obviously it was true. Saturdays, Sundays, Thanksgiving days have no existential significance. The sun, the moon, the stars, oceans, tides - all follow their normal course. My dad knew that also.

But these days have a lot of human significance. These are pivotal days for us to renew something within and to show greater commitment for whatever we are striving for. If we lived life in our pitch peak intensity, new years or any other day will have no special significance for us as well.

In light of this, I guess the best blessing some one can give to us would be - "May the next new year have no special significance to you!". True, but it sounds truly ridiculous to hear. We've gotten used to living this way and getting inspired in spurs.




A side note: The dinner cost Rs 3000.00 (per head). A couple of weeks back, for my dad's birthday, we had arranged dinner for 70 children in a home and it cost us about the same amount. No, I am not typing this out of guilt, but the stark disparity in economics is startling. And the restaurant was brimming yesterday!

Taj had a relatively quiet new year eve - in mark of respect for the Mumbai attacks where it was directly involved.

7 comments:

Raji said...

Deepak...:-) nice one.
In our culture new year (april 14th...or yogaathi etc) has a spiritual significance. I still remember on this day my aathamma used to make a sweet as well as a paavakkai dish to remind that life is sweet as well as bitter. families used to go to temples, kids start their classes then. Perhaps our forfathers saw life with a great wisdon and thats why sadhguru said once "every action and celebration and also death was taken as an opportunity for ultimate liberation in this culture"...:-)

may be its good to wish "let every day has the significance of a new year day" if one follows out culture.

A.J.Anto said...

So true! My mom used to give me a pinch of salt and a pinch of sugar the first thing in the morning of Jan 1st. :)
Even at that time, it stuck such a chord with me. Looking at this, most of the traditional new year wishes seems to be an actualization of a life spent in denial.

Deepak said...

Anto / Raji,
Now that you type these, I remember a colleague giving me a new year "prasadham" comprised of all tastes reminding of the same thing.

Raji,
The way you have rewritten the wish is good!

Change said...

May I invite you to have a look on my blog!

http://change-within/blogspot.com

Deepak said...

"Change",
I browsed through your blog. It's a lot to take in. I will review this more at leisure and get back to you.

Thanks for dropping by!

BTW, you managed to keep your name a secret everywhere! :)

Change said...

May I invite you to have a look on my blog!

http://change-within/blogspot.com

Raji said...

Deepak...:-) nice one.
In our culture new year (april 14th...or yogaathi etc) has a spiritual significance. I still remember on this day my aathamma used to make a sweet as well as a paavakkai dish to remind that life is sweet as well as bitter. families used to go to temples, kids start their classes then. Perhaps our forfathers saw life with a great wisdon and thats why sadhguru said once "every action and celebration and also death was taken as an opportunity for ultimate liberation in this culture"...:-)

may be its good to wish "let every day has the significance of a new year day" if one follows out culture.

 
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